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primary homework tudors

Who were the Tudors?

Kings and queens in the Tudor family ruled England from 1485-1603 . Both King Henry VIII and Elizabeth I belonged to the Tudor family.

During the time that the Tudor kings and queens reigned, a lot was happening in England. People were discovering more about the world through exploration, the Church of England was founded, England got a good reputation for having a strong Navy, more people were able to go to school and learn lots of different things, and art and music became an important part of culture.

Top 10 facts

  • There were six Tudor monarchs (kings and queens).
  • The first Tudor monarch was King Henry VII who was crowned in 1485, and the last was Queen Elizabeth I who ruled from 1558 to 1603.
  • Because Elizabeth I didn’t have any children, when she died in 1603 her cousin James I became king, uniting England and Scotland and starting a new royal family – the Stuarts.
  • Religion was very important in Tudor times . Everyone had to go to church, and it was best if you went to the same sorts of churches that the king or queen did.
  • If you were a Catholic when Henry VIII was king, or a Protestant when Mary I was Queen, you might get arrested, thrown into the Tower of London, or even executed!
  • Mary I had over 280 people put to death because of their religion (she was Catholic), so she got the nickname ‘Bloody Mary’.
  • It wasn’t all bad in Tudor times, though. Music and dances were very popular, and people practised their instruments so they could become good enough to play in the royal court.
  • Music was enjoyed by everyone, no matter which class they came from – gentlemen, citizens of the cities, yeomen of the countryside, and the poor.
  • Theatres were also very popular in Tudor times, which is how William Shakespeare got to be so famous for the plays he wrote. Both rich and poor people went to the theatre.
  • Executions and punishments were another form of entertainment in Tudor times. Lots of people would gather to see someone burned at the stake or beheaded, which doesn’t sound very fun today!
  • 1455-1485 The War of the Roses took place between the houses of York and Lancaster
  • 22 August 1485 Henry Tudor won the Battle of Bosworth Field, which ends the War of the Roses. He also declares himself king from this date
  • 28 June 1491 Henry VIII was born at Greenwich Palace
  • 21 April 1509 Henry VII died
  • 24 June 1509 Henry VIII was crowned king
  • 18 February 1516 Mary I was born in Greenwich
  • 7 September 1533 Elizabeth I was born in Greenwich
  • 12 October 1537 Edward VI was born at Hampton Court Palace
  • 28 January 1547 Henry VIII died
  • 20 February 1547 Edward VI was crowned king
  • 6 July 1553 Edward VI died
  • 10 July 1553 Lady Jane Grey became queen, as Edward VI wanted
  • 19 July 1553 Mary I was proclaimed Queen instead of Lady Jane Grey
  • 1 October 1553 Mary was officially crowned Queen
  • 12 February 1554 Lady Jane Grey was executed
  • 17 November 1558 Mary I died at St. James’s Palace
  • 15 January 1559 Elizabeth I was crowned queen
  • 24 March 1603 Elizabeth I died
  • 29 July 1567 Elizabeth’s cousin, James VI of Scotland, was crowned king – he is also known as James I of England; this ended the Tudor family line, as James belonged to the House of Stuart

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Did you know?

  • People in Tudor times ate their main meal in the middle of the day – around when we’d eat lunch. Their main meal could last for three hours!
  • People baked by putting food in an iron box, and placing it on an open fire.
  • In Tudor times, meat was cooked on a spit – it could be turned around and around over the fire so the meat cooked on all sides.
  • People used honey to sweeten food instead of sugar.
  • Children who were naughty at school would be beaten with a cane – boys from rich families would sometimes pay for another boy to get beaten instead. Imagine having that job!
  • If people felt sick, they wouldn’t take the medicines that we take today. Some of the cures they used sound funny to us now – for example, bald people thought they could grow hair if they used a shampoo made from crushed beetles!
  • Tudor towns and villages weren’t very clean. People threw rubbish in the street, and even emptied the loo there! It was very smelly.
  • People didn’t usually live to be older than age 35 in Tudor times.
  • Ships built in Tudor times were called galleons.
  • The Tudor monarch with the shortest rule was Lady Jane Grey – she was Queen for just nine days! She was in the Tower of London the whole time.

Can you find all the following in the gallery below?

  • A model of an English galleon, and what it would have looked like inside:
  • The Tudor rose
  • Tudor houses that are still around today
  • Lady Jane Grey
  • Elizabeth I
  • A Tudor room at Turton Tower
  • Tudor interiors in Salford, Manchester
  • Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire

primary homework tudors

The Tudors became royalty after winning the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, which ended the War of the Roses between the House of Lancaster and the House of York. Henry Tudor led the fight on the Lancaster side, and then married Elizabeth of York.

The civil war between the House of Lancaster and the House of York was called the War of the Roses because each side had a certain colour of rose to represent them – red for Lancaster and white for York. The Tudor rose is both red and white, symbolising that the two houses were joined together.

While Henry VIII  wanted his daughter Mary to become queen after his son Edward VI, Edward decided on his deathbed that he wanted Lady Jane Grey to rule instead because she was Protestant, like him. Mary was a Catholic. Jane Grey did become queen, but only for nine days, and she was never officially crowned – Mary became queen instead, and had Jane executed.

The kings and queens in Tudor times were very involved in religious matters. Everybody had to go to church, and whether you were Catholic or Protestant was very important. It sometimes meant the difference between life and death!

Henry VIII set up the Protestant Church of England , which meant England broke ties with the Catholic church. This also meant that Catholics weren’t very popular in England – some were even put to death. But, when Mary I became Queen it was the other way around – her mum, Catherine of Aragon, was Catholic and Mary was Catholic too. She had over 280 people put to death because of their religion, which gave her the nickname ‘Bloody Mary’.

After Mary, Elizabeth I (a Protestant) became Queen.

Some of the games played in Tudor times are games we still play today, such as bowls and tennis. The version of tennis played by Tudors was called ‘paume’.

A lot of what we know about what people would have had in their homes during Tudor times is from inventories, which are lists of possessions that people had when they died.

Music was very popular in Tudor times, and it was a large part of entertainment both in the royal court as well as for the peasants. It also meant that somebody from any class – rich or poor – who was good enough at an instrument could have the chance to play for the king or queen! Musical instruments played include the viol, hautboy, harpsichord, spinet and virginals.

According to someone who lived during Tudor times, William Harrison, there were four different classes in society:

  • gentlemen (nobles and professionals)
  • citizens of the cities (people who were free, not slaves, and who had special rights)
  • yeomen of the countryside (people who were free, not slaves, and could run cities and farms in the country)
  • poor (slaves, farm workers, and vagrants who didn’t have a home and lived on the streets)

School could be expensive, so only people who could pay for it would send their children. At grammar school, they’d learn maths, Latin and Greek, and about religion. Only boys went to school, though sometimes girls from rich families would have tutors. When Edward VI was king, some schools were set up that didn’t cost anything so more people were able to be educated.

Jobs that people would have had in Tudor times include being a butcher, baker, weaver, fishmonger (catching and selling fish), tailor, blacksmith, shoemaker and washerwoman. There were different kinds of jobs in the royal court that involved serving the king or queen, such as being a page or a lady in waiting.

If you did something wrong and broke the law in Tudor times, you could get a pretty harsh punishment . If any of these happened to you, you’d been let off easy: whipping, being branded with a hot iron, and being locked in between bits of wood in the centre of town for people to laugh at you. The worst punishments were executions, such as beheading, being hung, being burned at the stake, or being boiled alive. Executions were public events that lots of people would come to watch.

Names to know:

King Henry VII (1457-1509) – Henry VIII was the first Tudor king, and ruled from 1485-1509. He won the Battle of Bosworth Field, which ended the War of the Roses.

King Henry VIII (1491-1547) – King Henry VIII ruled from 1509-1547. Find out more about him here.  //crosslink//

King Edward VI (1537-1553) – King Edward VI ruled from 1547-1553. He was only nine when he became king, and he died at age 15 from a disease in his lungs. He wanted Lady Jane Grey to become Queen next instead of his older sister, Mary, because Jane was a Protestant like Edward.

Lady Jane Grey (1536 or 1537-1554) – Lady Jane Grey was Queen from 10-19 July in 1553. Even though she was legally Queen because King Edward VI had made it so, Edward’s sister Mary took over the throne and eventually had Jane executed. In fact, Jane had been locked in the Tower of London during the nine days she was Queen.

Mary I (1516-1558) – Mary I was Queen from 1553-1558. She was a devout Catholic and was very strict about people following the same faith – so strict, that she’d have Protestants executed. She was called ‘Bloody Mary’ because of this. Mary married King Philip II from Spain, and they didn’t have any children.

Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) – Queen Elizabeth I ruled from 1558-1603. 

William Shakespeare – William Shakespeare was a famous playwright during Tudor times. 

Related Videos

Just for fun...

  • Watch Horrible Histories clips about Tudors: King Henry VIII , Henry VIII's wives , Lady Jane Grey and Elizabeth I
  • Make Tudor smartard , sweet cottage cheese fritters
  • Listen to some Tudor music
  • Try a Tudors Grid Club game
  • Complete a Tudor trivia quiz
  • Dowload colouring sheets of  Tudor rulers and everyday life
  • 'Listen' to life in Tudor times with a collection of comic sketches, short dramas and music from BBC Schools Radio. Topics include rich and poor in Tudor times, ships and seafaring, medicine, the Elizabethan stage and life in the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.
  • Watch a step-by-step video on how to make a traditional Tudor Cheese Tart
  • Make your own Tudor house , Tudor crown and Tudor rose with step-by-step instructions and videos from Hobbycraft

Children's books about Tudors

primary homework tudors

Find out more:

  • A children's guide to Tudor life from DKfindout!
  • Read 10 fast facts about the Tudors
  • Watch videos about life in the Tudor times, including Tudor merchants' lives , Tudor children's lives and Tudor housewives' lives
  • A timeline of Tudor monarchs
  • Read about  strange and gruesome cures in Tudor times
  • Find out about Tudor buildings and houses in an architecture podcast from FunKids
  • Read fictional stories for children set in Tudor times
  • Discover more about Tudor health
  • Learn amazing facts about  Tudor food
  • Read all about Shakespeare's Globe
  • Look at a portrait of Henry VIII's family
  • Meet the crew of the Tudor ship the Mary Rose
  • Examine Tudor objects including a sand shaker, a wooden trencher (plate) and a lantern
  • Read a children's magazine about Tudor England

See for yourself

  • Visit a replica of the Globe Theatre , where Shakespeare’s plays were performed – it’s very near the spot where the real Globe Theatre once stood
  • See Hampton Court Palace , where Henry VIII lived
  • Explore the Tower of London , and find out more about crime and punishment in Tudor times.
  • Visit Framlingham Castle , where Mary I stayed before she became Queen.
  • Henry VIII built Pendennis Castle as a fortress to ward off enemies from France and Spain.
  • Lots of Tudors are buried in Westminster Abbey , with very ornate graves, but Henry VIII is buried at Windsor Castle

primary homework tudors

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The Tudors primary resource

Explore the influence of the monarchy during tudor times, from henry viii to elizabeth i.

This primary resource explores significant social changes in Britain during the time of the Tudors, presented as an easy-to-read comic. Discover the influence of the monarchy during this time, from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I. What happened to Henry VIII’s wives? How did Christianity change in Britain during this time?

Pupils will learn about social, cultural and religious changes during the time of the Tudors and how they have affected life in Britain today, using our National Geographic Kids’ Tudors primary resource sheet.

The teaching resource can be used in study group tasks for a simple explanation of significant events during Tudor times, as a printed handout for each pupil to read themselves, or for display on the interactive whiteboard, as part of a whole class reading exercise.

Activity: Ask the children to select one of the key characters from the comic to conduct a case study on. Pupils could write a newspaper article about Henry VIII’s destruction of the Catholic Church, or reporting his death with reference to his six wives. They could carry out their own research on the Spanish Armada and how Elizabeth I reacted to the attempted invasion.

N.B.  The following information for mapping the resource documents to the school curriculum is specifically tailored to the  English National Curriculum  and  Scottish Curriculum for Excellence . We are currently working to bring specifically tailored curriculum resource links for our other territories; including  South Africa ,  Australia  and  New Zealand . If you have any queries about our upcoming curriculum resource links, please email:  [email protected]

This History primary resource assists with teaching the following History objectives from the National Curriculum :

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world.
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

National Curriculum Key Stage 1 History objective:  

  • Pupils should be taught: significant historical events, people and places in their own locality
  • Pupils should be taught: the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]

National Curriculum Key Stage 2 History objective:

  • Pupils should be taught a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

This History primary resource assists with teaching the following Social Studies Second level objective from the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence :

  • I can discuss why people and events from a particular time in the past were important, placing them within a historical sequence
  • I can compare and contrast a society in the past with my own and contribute to a discussion of the similarities and differences

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Can you remember what happened in Henry VIII's life?

Try the activities below, then test your knowledge with a Tudors quiz!

The best guides and activities all about the Tudors. They contain text, videos and challenges to help you understand, practise and test your knowledge.

Who was William Shakespeare?

What did William Shakespeare do? Find out more with Bitesize - KS1 History.

Who was William Shakespeare?

The Wives of Henry VIII Song. video The Wives of Henry VIII Song

Know the Wives of Henry VIII? Sing along to this song from CBBC - Horrible Histories.

The Wives of Henry VIII Song

Henry VIII Song video Henry VIII Song

Listen to this song to hear about how Henry got Sweaty! From CBBC - Horrible Histories.

Henry VIII Song

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A popular unit of study in Key Stage 2 has in the past been the Tudors. It is possible to continue to study the Tudors through either a local study or through a unit of study beyond 1066, although the emphasis now shifts to the Tudors representing a turning point. Given that this period saw the Reformation, 6 wives and the first female queen ruling in her own right, turning points are not difficult to find. In this section, you will find articles and resources to help you to plan to teach the Tudor period as a local study or turning point. 

primary homework tudors

Using inventories in Key Stage 2 history

Continuing the focus on using historical sources, this article by Clare Lally introduces us to the use of historical inventories. Using examples from the Tudor period, Clare considers how inventories can be used to explore diversity of experience between rich and poor. At every stage of historical enquiry, from primary...

primary homework tudors

Teaching the Wars of the Roses in primary history

The Tudors is a relatively popular topic for those Key Stage 2 teachers looking at a theme extending beyond 1066. In this article Matthew Sossick argues that there is a large gap in understanding if pupils understand nothing of how the Tudors emerged as such a dominant dynasty. This means...

primary homework tudors

Teaching about ‘these islands’ since 1066

This article builds on an earlier publication in Primary History Issue 89 which considered the history of ‘these islands’ before 1066 in the primary history curriculum. Both articles address the first aim of the National Curriculum which indicates that children should:  know and understand the history of these islands as...

primary homework tudors

Exploring the spices of the east: how curry got to our table

Every migrant to our shores brings with them the flavours and dishes of home, every trader searches for exotic and exciting new taste sensations. Britain’s culinary history has been shaped by migration, trade and empire. How curry, exploration and empire building are linked At the end of the Tudor period...

primary homework tudors

Local significant individuals

The National Curriculum specifies a local study both at Key Stages 1 and 2. Basing your local study around an individual is a great way to bring the heritage of your locality to life. Many of these individuals are part of larger national events and changes and seeing these changes at...

primary homework tudors

Primary Scheme of Work: The Elizabethans

This unit provides children the opportunity to look at Elizabethan times as an aspect of British history that extends pupils' chronological knowledge beyond 1066. This unit is supported by the following article: Bracey, P. (2018) The Elizabethans. All Banquets and fun? Primary History 80 (NB available to HA members only) Key vocabulary:...

primary homework tudors

Scheme of Work: Grace O'Malley

This unit encourages pupils to explore the past by examining their ideas about pirates, with particular reference to Grace O’Malley. The key question leads children to consider what are the characteristics of a pirate and to challenge stereotypes in the light of historical enquiry. The key question also leads to...

primary homework tudors

Elizabethan times: Just banquets and fun?

Although much of the Key Stage 2 history curriculum relates to the period before 1066, we are expected to include 'a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066' (DfE, 2013,p.5) This raises two questions:a) How can a post-1066 topic be related...

primary homework tudors

Strange goings-on: exploring the benefits of learning history through outdoor pedagogy

Learning history outside the classroom has tremendous benefits. This article looks at one such example where children can get an immersive, residential historical experience. This not only provides a memorable learning experience, but the combination of an evocative setting, together with carefully crafted activities taught using an outdoor pedagogy, allows...

primary homework tudors

Why stop at the Tudors?

When deciding to teach the topic of Benin to my Year 5 pupils I was somewhat daunted by the fact that I had never taught it before, and I was determined that it be a meaningful experience which benefited their narrative, chronological and historical skills-based understanding of the subject. I was...

primary homework tudors

Using museum and heritage sites to promote higher-level learning at KS2

The Key Stage 2 Primary History Curriculum sets ambitious challenges for pupils: "…They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge...

primary homework tudors

Using Horrible History to develop primary literacy and history

When I started planning for my Key Stage 2 literacy lessons last year, I wanted to link them to my history topic, the Tudors, and I also needed them to cover a significant amount of non-fiction English objectives, having focused on fiction and poetry texts in the previous term. One...

primary homework tudors

Poverty in Britain: A development study for Key Stage 2

One of the requirements for Key Stage 2 history is for some history that extends beyond 1066. Various suggestions have been made including an examination of change within a social theme. The example given is Crime and Punishment but the opportunities for something interesting are vast. This article focuses on...

primary homework tudors

Podcast Series: William I to Henry VII

An HA Podcasted History featuring Professor David Bates and Professor Nicholas Vincent of the University of East Anglia, Dr Philip Morgan of Keele University, Professor Mark Ormrod of the University of York, Dr James Davis of Queens University Belfast, Professor Michael Hicks of the University of Winchester, Dr Sean Cunningham of...

A living timeline

The problem Pupils' background knowledge - Tudors and Victorians Here at Knebworth House, primary school children visit us to enhance their learning of both the Tudors and the Victorians, in particular; both are popular periods to study within the primary curriculum and both have special significance for us at Knebworth....

primary homework tudors

Visual Literacy: Learning through pictures and images

Please note: this article pre-dates the current National Curriculum and some content and references are outdated. What questions does the portrait raise in your mind? What messages does the artist intend to convey? How does the artist convey those messages to the intended audience? What might have been the circumstances under which the...

Grace O' Malley, alias Granuaile, pirate & politician, c. 1530-1603

The Northamptonshire Inspection & Advisory Service (NIAS) can confirm Paul Bracey’s view of the way Ireland’s rich stories help to provide a ‘sounder map of the past’ and increase ‘choice, range and fun in our teaching’. (see pages 6-8) At Naseby CE Primary School the excited curiosity of Years 1...

Britain and the wider world in Tudor times

The first two articles in this series introduced three generic principles which might underpin planning a scheme of work in the KS2 History Curriculum. Article 1 (Jan 2001) drew on contemporary history to analyse and explain the principles. Article 2 (May 2001) was based mainly on material from the Victorian...

The Plague in Cumberland 1597-1598. Some documents used in the Cumbria Record Office (Carlisle) by Key Stage 2 pupils studying the Tudors

Outbreaks of the plague were common in the 16th century and the north of England was badly affected in the 1590s. It is believed that the plague arrived in Cumberland from Newcastle about Michaelmas 1597 and continued for over a year. The only places for which documentation exists are the...

The Tudors & Tudor History Lessons, Worksheets & Resources

Browse our online library of the tudors lessons and resources. aimed at students 11-14 years old (ks3) & 14-16 year old (gcse). great for home study or to use within the classroom environment., featured resources.

Looking to save time and find the most popular and useful resources on School History? Take a look at the featured resources below.

KS3, GCSE & A-Level Resources

Are you teaching students aged 11 to 16? If so, you can save a lot of time with our specific Tudor England modules below.

All Resources

Lady jane grey facts & worksheets.

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The Battle of Bosworth 1485

The battle of Bosworth is one of the most important battles in English history. It led to the War of the Roses, and planted the Tudor house on the throne of England.

What happened the battle of Bosworth?

Henry Tudor , (Henry VII), earl of Richmond and a Lancastrian, defeated King Richard III, a Yorkist, at the battle of Bosworth Field on 22 August 1485 .

Battle of Bosworth saw the death of Richard III Richard III was the last English monarch to have been killed in battle.

Henry Tudor landed at Milford Haven on 7 August in an attempt to claim the throne of England. He gathered supporters on his journey through Wales, and by the time he arrived in the Midlands, he had amassed an army of an estimated 5,000 men. Richard III, on the other hand, had an army of nearly 8,000.

After the battle, Henry Tudor was crowned as King Henry VII , marking the beginning of the 118-year reign of the Tudor dynasty in England.

Henry Vll (representing the Lancaster family) married Elizabeth of York (representing the York family). This marriage united the two families. Henry created the Tudor rose , containing both the White Rose of York and the Red Rose of Lancaster. It symbolized the end of a struggle between York and Lancaster,

More information

The Battle of Bosworth What do we really know about the battle? Bosworth facts and Bosworth legends .

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The Tudors Homework task project

The Tudors Homework task project

Subject: History

Age range: 7-11

Resource type: Worksheet/Activity

Martynxxxx's teaching resource Shop

Last updated

27 October 2018

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A creative homework sheet for the topic of The Tudors ! Ideal for project based and the children loved the presentation show and tell style I used with it ! Great for all year groups really although better for years 3/4 and 5 !

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What happened with Moscow’s FIRST airport? (PHOTOS)

primary homework tudors

Located in the northwest of Moscow, the Khodynskoe Pole (Eng: “Field”) territory is famous among Muscovites as an area for large-scale events, since the times of Ekaterina the Great. At the end of the 19th century, the All-Russian Art and Industrial Exhibition was opened here. 

Siemens Pavilion, 1882.

Siemens Pavilion, 1882.

On May 30, 1896, during the Nicholas II coronation celebrations, when guests were promised gifts from the Emperor, about half a million people crowded there. The organization was poor and a terrible stampede ensued, which led to the death of 1,400. After that, the phrase “to cause a Khodynka” became the synonym to any pandemonium. Meanwhile, on the airfield, new barracks for the army were built.

Funerals of the Khodynka victims, 1896.

Funerals of the Khodynka victims, 1896.

In 1910 in Moscow, the first Russian aeronautical society was created, under the Emperor’s patronage, headed by the commander of the Moscow military district. Subsequently, a part of the field was turned into an airdrome.

The main entrance, 1910.

The main entrance, 1910.

The first of the airdrome’s infrastructure was built thanks to aviation enthusiasts: amateur pilots donated their own money for the construction of the runway and aircraft hangars. After which they began to make flights above the city in their own planes. The field was still being used for army parades and civil festivals, but  aviation shows also began to appear.

Moscow aviation week, 1916.

Moscow aviation week, 1916.

After the 1917 Revolution, Khodynskoe Pole became the cradle of Soviet aviation. Besides using it for the army’s needs, as well as preparing and training pilots, in the beginning of 1920s, the first routes for civil flights were opened from there. In 1922, Russia’s first international flight Moscow - Konigsberg (Kaliningrad) - Berlin started from there.  

First pilots of the aviation school, 1930.

First pilots of the aviation school, 1930.

In 1923, the first regular flight between Moscow and Nizhny Novgorod was opened and the Dobrolyot society was established - the future Ministry of Civil Aviation. The first planes were able to carry just 4-8 people, but flights to different cities were made everyday from there. It may sound weird today, but on the first flight, the plane’s passengers had to monitor the plane’s body and be ready to help the pilot!

The plane came to Nizhny Novgorod, 1924.

The plane came to Nizhny Novgorod, 1924.

By the beginning of the 1930s, the Soviet Union had already organized regular international and domestic flights and even created a border service. In 1931,  the first Soviet air terminal was built at the Khodynskoe Pole airfield (located near the Aeroport green line metro station). After checking in at this terminal, the passenger was taken to the plane by bus. 

ANT-14 at the Khodynskoe Pole airport, 1934.

ANT-14 at the Khodynskoe Pole airport, 1934.

However, after the crash of an ANT-20 in the nearby Sokol dacha settlement in 1935, the airport stopped civil flights. Since then, the airdrome was reduced to being used only for servicing, testing and military flights. 

ANT-25 flying.

ANT-25 flying.

After World War II, new airports were built in Moscow, but far away from the city center: Vnukovo, Bykovo, Ostafyevo. But they all used the terminal at Khodynka.

Inside the air terminal.

Inside the air terminal.

The first Russian airport also became the test field for the Ilyushin and Sukhoi design bureau.

Aviation exhibition at the Khodynka airfield.

Aviation exhibition at the Khodynka airfield.

Meanwhile, the Soviet Defence Ministry moved its sport infrastructure onto the territory: swimming pool, stadium, exhibition hall. On the airfield, aviation exhibitions were also held. 

Exhibition at Khodynka.

Exhibition at Khodynka.

The last plane took off from there on July 3, 2003. On the airfield, there still were lots of aircrafts, and the city administration had plans to turn it into an Aviation Museum. But, while the planes were waiting to be restored (note: they now are kept in the Vadim Zadorozhny Technics Museum), the territory was transferred to the city. That’s how a sports complex, Moscow’s biggest shopping mall and the new metro station called CSKA were eventually built.

The old aircrafts between the new residential area, 2008.

The old aircrafts between the new residential area, 2008.

In 2018, on the place of the runway, the new Khodynskoe Pole park appeared. Only the plane on the kids playground is left as a reminder that there once was a real airport. The runway itself has now been turned into a big zone for skaters and a promenade for pedestrians. 

The new park.

The new park.

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primary homework tudors

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VI Lenin on

Speech at the, first all-russia congress of working women, november 19, 1918.

Delivered: 19 November, 1918 First Published: 22 November, 1918, Pravda No. 253; Published according the Pravda text Source: Lenin’s Collected Works, Progress Publishers, Moscow, Volume 28, 1974, pages 180-182 Transcribed and HTML Markup: Sally Ryan (proofed by R. Cymbala ; see source file.) Online Version: V.I.Lenin Internet Archive , 2002

Comrades, in a certain respect this congress of the feminine section of the proletarian army is of particularly great significance, since in all countries women have been the slowest to stir. There can be no socialist revolution, unless a vast section of the toiling women takes an important part in it.

( Comrade Lenin is greeted by the delegates with stormy applause .) Comrades, in a certain sense this Congress of the women's section of the workers' army has a special significance, because one of the hardest things in every country has been to stir the women into action. There can be no socialist revolution unless very many working women take a big part in it.

In all civilised countries, even the most advanced, the position of women is such as justifies their being called domestic slaves. Not in a single capitalist country, not even in the freest Republic, do women enjoy complete equality.

In all civilised countries, even the most advanced, women are actually no more than domestic slaves. Women do not enjoy full equality in any capitalist state, not even in the freest of republics.

The aim of the Soviet Republic is to abolish, in the first place, all restrictions of the rights of women. The Soviet Government has completely abolished the source of bourgeois filth, repression and humiliation — divorce proceedings.

One of the primary tasks of the Soviet Republic is to abolish all restrictions on women's rights. The Soviet government has completely abolished divorce proceedings, that source of bourgeois degradation, repression and humiliation.

For nearly a year now our completely free divorce laws have been in force. We issued a decree abolishing the difference in the status of children born in wedlock and those born out of wedlock, and also the various political disabilities. In no other country have the toiling women achieved such complete freedom and equality.

It will soon be a year now since complete freedom of divorce was legislated. We have passed a decree annulling all distinction between legitimate and illegitimate children and removing political restrictions. Nowhere else in the world have equality and freedom for working women been so fully established.

We know that the entire burden of the obsolete rules is borne by the women of the working class.

We know that it is the working-class woman who has to bear the full brunt of antiquated codes.

Our law wiped out, for the first time in history, all that made women inferior. But it is not a matter of law. In our cities and factory settlements this law on the complete freedom of marriage is taking root, but in the countryside it very frequently exists only on paper. There, church marriage still predominates. This is due to the influence of the priests, and it is more difficult to fight this evil than the old laws.

For the first time in history, our law has removed everything that denied women rights. But the important thing is not the law. In the cities and industrial areas this law on complete freedom of marriage is doing all right, but in the countryside it all too frequently remains a dead letter. There the religious marriage still predominates. This is due to the influence of the priests, an evil that is harder to combat than the old legislation.

Religious prejudices must be fought very cautiously; a lot of harm is caused by those who carry on this struggle in such a way as to offend religious feelings. The struggle must be carried on by means of propaganda, by means of enlightenment. By introducing acrimony into the struggle we may antagonise the masses; this kind of struggle contributes to the division of the masses according to religion, but our strength is in unity. The deepest source of religious prejudice is poverty and ignorance; it is with these evils that we must contend.

We must be extremely careful in fighting religious prejudices; some people cause a lot of harm in this struggle by offending religious feelings. We must use propaganda and education. By lending too sharp an edge to the struggle we may only arouse popular resentment; such methods of struggle tend to perpetuate the division of the people along religious lines, whereas our strength lies in unity. The deepest source of religious prejudice is poverty and ignorance; and that is the evil we have to combat.

Up to the present the position of women has been such that it is called a position of slavery. Women are crushed by their domestic drudgery, and only socialism can relieve them from this drudgery, when we shall pass on from small household economy to social economy and to social tilling of the soil.

The status of women up to now has been compared to that of a slave; women have been tied to the home, and only socialism can save them from this. They will only be completely emancipated when we change from small-scale individual farming to collective farming and collective working of the land. That is a difficult task. But now that Poor Peasants' Committees are being formed, the time has come when the socialist revolution is being consolidated.

Only then will women be fully free and emancipated. It is a difficult task. It has been observed in the experience of all liberation movements that the success of a revolution depends on the extent to which women take part in it. The Soviet government is doing everything to enable women to carry on their proletarian socialist activity independently.

Up to the present not a single Republic has been capable of emancipating the women. The Soviet government will help them. Our cause is invincible, for in all countries the invincible working class is rising. This movement signifies the growth of the invincible socialist revolution.

The poorest part of the rural population is only now beginning to organise, and socialism is acquiring a firm foundation in these organisations of poor peasants.

Before, often the town became revolutionary and then the countryside.

But the present revolution relies on the countryside, and therein lie its significance and strength. the experience of all liberation movements has shown that the success of a revolution depends on how much the women take part in it. The Soviet government is doing everything in its power to enable women to carry on independent proletarian socialist work.

The Soviet government is in a difficult position because the imperialists of all countries hate Soviet Russia and are preparing to go to war with her for kindling the fire of revolution in a number of countries and for taking determined steps towards socialism.

Now that they are out to destroy revolutionary Russia, the ground is beginning to burn under their own feet. You know how the revolutionary movement is spreading in Germany. In Denmark the workers are fighting their government. In Switzerland and Holland the revolutionary movement is getting stronger. The revolutionary movement in these small countries has no importance in itself, but it is particularly significant because there was no war in these countries and they had the most "constitutional" democratic system. If countries like these are stirring into action, it makes us sure the revolutionary movement is gaining ground all over the world.

No other republic has so far been able to emancipate woman. The Soviet Government is helping her. Our cause is invincible because the invincible working class is rising in all countries. This movement signifies the spread of the invincible socialist revolution. ( Prolonged applause . All sing the "Internationale" .)

Collected Works Volume 28 Collected Works Table of Contents Lenin Works Archive

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